Saturday, April 14, 2007

Lambro: "Hillary's numbers are slipping already"

Another insightful analysis from America's most unsubtle Republican Party tool, the political 'editor' for the Washington Times (aka The Moonie Times).

I detest this writer, but in the interest of public service I held my nose and read the original column, "Her aura of invincibility is fading fast." I found that, while it's still pretty obviously designed to promote Republican talking points, the Courier's 274-word edit of the 816-word column manages to make Lambro look even worse than he is.

The Courier's headline points to the agenda that will take no one here by surprise: The Courier hates the Senator from New York, and takes every opportunity to slide another hatpin into its Hillary doll. Look at the two versions, see for yourself.

3 comments:

leftturnclyde said...

Grrrrr , again they did it again they took a 800 word or so piece and edited it threw out more than half of the words and changed the meaning to suit their own ..is this standard in the newspaper world ? ..if it is Im gonna need a WAY bigger mallet

mj said...

< serling> for your consideration < /serling> here is the text of a comment which i submitted to the courier site. i doubt they will print it, and i wanted someone to get some entertainment from it:

-------------------------------
Why should we listen to anything Donald Lambro has to say about the Democrats?

I sure wouldn't pay much attention to "analysis" of Republican poll results written by Al Franken.

The Hillary-bashing here is so transparent and coming from such a tainted source that I would think a respectable paper would avoid printing it -- especially if that paper has to cut 66% of the column to make it fit.

coyoteradiotheater said...

Loooord, I wouldn't have the slightest problem with an even more virulent right-way paper if,in the grand tradition, there was a paper with a left slant to play against it. How intellectually interesting it would be to take both papers and let my own mind choose between them, article by article, fact by fact.

As it is, I get an article written by no one I know, about people I'll never meet, repackaged at a fraction of its orginal length without apparent regard to la idea juste.

All because a newspaper's supposed to have something in it about these people.